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Why You Should Think Twice Before Posting On Social Media

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Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are three of many social media platforms reaching billions of people daily. We feel this need to share every second of our lives with the world.

Consequently, some seconds include negative posts about your lover, best friend, co-worker, management, or family. Those personal frustrations unravel to the world. The frustrations leave, and you're on to the next post.

Is that the best way to channel anger, stress, misery, or melancholy? Unless it's private, anyone can view the information on the page without having an account on the platform. It doesn't leave either, so anyone can find it years from now.

Likewise, contemplate the person mentioned in the post. The person may not appreciate private information accessible to everyone looming the internet. There is a thing as airing dirty laundry on social media, and the ramifications are dire. Allow this article to explain.

The dirty laundry line

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Social media don't provide too many limitations other than the obvious (explicit content, creating fake accounts, etc.). Therefore, many dirty laundry comments fall within social media guidelines. The decision to air sensitive information on social media is due to emotion. Revenge is in the brain, and the post occurs from acting on emotion without thinking it through.

It is about hurting the other person and eliminating self-pain simultaneously. This is an over-sharing impulse made to self-serve. The post is live, and everyone reading it will give instant feedback. The zinger makes some cheer and laugh; not all will. Regardless, any reaction is great. In the short run, you win because you destroyed the other party.

The ramification

The ‘feel-good' moment turns counterproductive, and no one benefits. When the post gains traction (and it does at an accelerated rate), everyone involved will get stung. Beginning with the other party, the post deteriorates the bashed person's image.

The respect leaves. Gossip, bullying and cyberbullying take its place. It becomes difficult to co-exist with employees and managers. The person may lose their promotion, bonuses, benefits, or professional certification/license.

The post may cost him or her job and a possible job reference. Consequently, the post also breaks up families, friendships, and relationships. Already strained interactions get colder. Random strangers will know secrets meant for confidentiality. The humiliated person never wants to see you again. It's over.

The backlash continues with the person who posted the hurtful remark. That person's true intent – harm – is obvious. The refusal to patch things up in private or in court shows how uncompromising that person is.

It makes the person childish and vengeful. The same people who responded to the post will not trust you with their secret. The person will have a tough time gaining new friends and relationships due to those antics.

As time passes, the person will move forward, but the nasty reputation remains. Friends, family, spouse, co-workers, management and online users will never forget about the outburst. The trust is gone.

In the end, no one wins.

You decide!

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Some hurtful posts force users to choose sides. There ‘the hurtful remark' side, the bashed person's side, the understanding side (agree with both sides), and the ‘neither/whatever' side.

If the post gains a majority on your side, does that mean you win? What is the prize? Regardless, the problem is still unresolved. The same goes for the other party. Social media don't substitute or replace the courtroom. A vast majority read the post and side with a person out of emotion, not comprehension.

The bashed person may feel like responding on social media to defend him or herself. The original poster responds back, and the bashed victim responds. As the responses continue, this turns into a back-and-forth argument. This helps no one gain the upper hand. It makes everyone appear foolish. Responding is pointless; let karma do it for you.

Posting remorse

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Similar to buyer's remorse after a purchase, a posting remorse is a guilt after posting something. Yes, people have seen the post beforehand. No, the world's not ending. Therefore, admit the mistake in a separate post. Mention how sorry you are about the post, apologize to everyone

Mention how sorry you are about the post, apologize to everyone involved and don't make the same mistake again. A good apology comes from the heart and sounds sincere. If finding the right words is a struggle, search Google for apology examples. Use that as inspiration for an original apology post. Finally, remove the offensive post. If it's possible to bury the hatchet, accept the olive branch.

If finding the right words is a struggle, search Google for apology examples. Use that as inspiration for an original apology post. Finally, remove the offensive post. If it's possible to bury the hatchet, accept the olive branch.

In conclusion, posting on impulse is a selfish fix that helps no one resolve his or her differences. In most situations, airing dirty laundry on social media don't end well. Exposing secrets on social media hurts both people. Sadly, whether the post is true is irrelevant. Users don't care how it started or participate in the blame game. Users only care about the verbal smack down and

Sadly, whether the post is true is irrelevant. Users don't care how it started or participate in the blame game. Users only care about the verbal smack down and speading gossip about their version of events. Never respond to a spiteful, hate-filled, discrediting post. Talk is cheap, and actions speak louder than words. Remain above the fray and resolve the issue offline.

Do you feel remorse about a social media post? Don't keep us in the dark. Share your story with like-minded people in the comments below. Help someone avoid the mistakes you made. Think before you post. Additionally, share this post on your social media accounts. This article contains juicy and rich information that will save you from humiliation and embarrassment on both sides.

About the author

Tonya Jones Reynolds

A professional writer with years of experience, I like adding my personal spin on various topics. I worked in various marketplaces like Textbroker and Blogmutt.

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